One Pivotal Incident Inspired the Development of Longer Lasting Batteries for Land Mobile Radios

Curt Quinter, President and Chief Engineer
Impact Power Technologies

A San Antonio, Texas police officer was out on patrol when he suddenly found himself caught in a shootout and away from his vehicle.  He tried to call for backup only to discover that his 2-way radio battery had died and his spares were at the station.  The officer was killed in the line of duty, but this kind of tragic loss should never happen. Read more about One Pivotal Incident Inspired the Development of Longer Lasting Batteries for Land Mobile Radios

Battery Backup Thermal Runaway Fears? Render it Harmless Through Continuous Monitoring

Tom Shannon, Director of Business Development • BatteryDAQ, Inc.

Thermal runaway is the disaster no one saw coming until it is too late.  It sounds like a horror movie, and it could well be, if batteries are not properly maintained. Every article on the subject will point out something like “If the design of the battery, coupled with the installation location, allows for proper dissipation of increased battery temperatures, thermal runaway is unlikely”. Read more about Battery Backup Thermal Runaway Fears? Render it Harmless Through Continuous Monitoring

The Sound You Hear is Completely Normal

Upal Sengupta, Staff Applications Engineer
Texas Instruments

Have you ever had trouble with your car and taken it to the shop for repair, only to have the mechanic tell you that there’s nothing wrong with it?  I used to have an old truck that made a weird rattling noise in damp weather.  Nobody ever figured out what it was, and the conclusion was that it was supposed to sound that way.  (I drove that truck for 15 years before I finally traded it in a few weeks ago, so I guess it must have been fine.) Read more about The Sound You Hear is Completely Normal

The Path of Least Resistance

Upal Sengupta, Staff Applications Engineer
Texas Instruments – Battery Management Solutions

One (almost literal) “rule of thumb,” which I learned some years ago, was that if you couldn’t hold your finger on an IC for more than one second without feeling pain, the chip’s case temperature was probably above 50ºC.  While I don’t recommend this technique as a substitute for doing actual thermal measurements on your PCB, it was an interesting discovery at the time… and of course it was also easier to do when IC packages were a little bigger than they are now. Read more about The Path of Least Resistance

The Path of Least Resistance

Upal Sengupta, Staff Applications Engineer
Texas Instruments – Battery Management Solutions

One (almost literal) “rule of thumb,” which I learned some years ago, was that if you couldn’t hold your finger on an IC for more than one second without feeling pain, the chip’s case temperature was probably above 50ºC.  While I don’t recommend this technique as a substitute for doing actual thermal measurements on your PCB, it was an interesting discovery at the time… and of course it was also easier to do when IC packages were a little bigger than they are now. Read more about The Path of Least Resistance